To Combat Panic Anxiety Think “3-2-1”

To Combat  Panic Anxiety Think “3-2-1”

In a previous blog, I wrote about different manifestations of anxiety: generalized anxiety, anxiety attacks and panic attacks. At the Mindful Psychotherapy Practice, I often encounter clients who experience one or all of these forms of anxiety, and many of them get great temporary relief from the “3-2-1” exercise.

One of my patients, Janie, just had this kind of experience few weeks ago. She had turned in the final draft of a report she and her team had been working on for months, and it suddenly occurred to her that she might have forgotten to double check one section.

You Are Not Alone: Common Forms of Anxiety

You Are Not Alone: Common Forms of Anxiety

As a psychotherapist practicing in New York City, I’ve treated my share of patients who experience a baseline of anxiety, intermittent anxiety and panic attacks.

What’s the difference between them?

People who have a persistent level of anxiety live with a baseline of excessive, uncontrollable worry about a number of things – and they may anticipate disaster even when the actual events do not merit it. They may experience any or all of the following symptoms: restlessness, fatigue, trouble concentrating, muscle tension or sleep disturbances.

Dealing with Family at Holiday Get-Togethers

Dealing with Family at Holiday Get-Togethers

Do you long for that connected, loving family feeling at holiday get-togethers? Are you instead disappointed, frustrated or hurt, wondering why your family gatherings resemble a horror film more than a Hallmark movie? Navigating family gatherings can be challenging in general, but particularly around the holidays when expectations and pressure to feel close and happy are high.

Dread no more! Here are some ideas to help you feel more peaceful before during and after the family function.

5 brilliant mindfulness tips to brighten your holiday spirit

5 brilliant mindfulness tips to brighten your holiday spirit

Tis’ the season of the holidays, and while we may strive for joy, peace and yuletide cheer, this time of year often brings  an abundance of stress and anxiety.  The months of November and December can rapidly escalate  the pressure to orchestrate the perfect holiday ambiance. The search for the perfect gift or throwing the perfect holiday party can activate an impulse to measure our self-worth against the standards of our “ideal” selves or others.  Before we know it, holiday cheer is transformed into holiday madness. We find ourselves unwittingly caught up in the frenzied snowstorm of mixed emotions and self criticism.  

Getting to the Heart of the Matter Hawaii Retreat : Unlocking Blocks to Intimacy

 Alohavillas.com | Luxurious Beach Front Resort

Alohavillas.com | Luxurious Beach Front Resort

Mindful Psychotherapy Services is happy to announce our Hawaiian retreat “Getting to the heart of the matter: unlocking blocks to intimacy”

We hope that many of you will be able to join us for a uniquely powerful experience and intensive track to positive change in a luxurious, beachfront villa on the Island of Maui. This 5-day Hawaii retreat includes locally sourced meals by a private chef, meditation instruction, yoga and 3 full days of workshops and process groups led by Toni Herbine-Blank, international speaker, author and founder of Intimacy from the Inside Out©. 

In this concentrated program, you’ll transform your relationship to yourself and others and discover the key to unlocking blocks to intimacy. 

How big can your heart get?

Why Therapists Don’t Give Advice

Why Therapists Don’t Give Advice

“I always pass on good advice. It is the only thing to do with it. It is never of any use to oneself.” -Oscar Wilde

It’s a Wednesday afternoon, and the sun is casting a golden light through the blinds. I am sitting across from my patient Andrew, who wrinkles his face and says in an exasperated tone, “Look, I know you don’t give advice, but what do you think I should do about this mess?”

I respond, “It would be easy for me to answer your questions with advice, but how would that be of any help to you?”

Toxic Bosses

Toxic Bosses

If you’ve ever worked for a “toxic boss” the following should sound familiar: Your boss repeatedly criticizes you, blames you, compares you (unfavorably) to others, discounts your contributions and worth, and is hostile or passive-aggressive. You can’t always put your finger on why, but you end up tied up in a knot, frustrated, angry or demoralized with each interaction. As a result you – and most likely your colleagues – experience an underlying feeling of anxiety, distrust, negativity, helplessness, lack of energy…even despair.